English Speaking Tip: Keep the Conversation Going

English speaking

English Speaking Tip: Learn How to Keep the Conversation Going I’m sure you’ve had this experience before. You’re at a party, at school, or at a family event. You’re talking to someone and then you start to have nothing to talk about. It can be a bad feeling, and I know that it most definitely makes me nervous. I’m sure it’s the same for you. Here are some English speaking tips to help you keep the conversation going. Learn how to be an excellent conversational partner and avoid that awkward silence! Are you ready for some conversation awesome? Let’s go!…

Continue Reading

Small Talk for ESL Students: 4 Activities to Try Out

small-talk-for-ESL-students

Small Talk for ESL Students I taught in Korean universities for 10 years. Something that I’ve noticed during that time is that my students are often really, really bad at engaging in small talk, even the more advanced level students. They usually know how to put together complex sentences and the intricacies of vocabulary usage but when it comes to having a basic conversation with something they don’t know, they’re often at a bit of a loss. This makes my students sometimes very awkward, shy and uncomfortable. This results in that my students seem like they don’t know English! However,…

Continue Reading

Top 5 ESL Conversation Activities for Adults

ESL conversation activities

ESL Conversation Activities If you want to make your English conversation class as interesting, engaging and fun as possible for the students, you’ll need these top 5 ESL conversation activities for adults. They’re guaranteed to get your students speaking English in the most painless way possible! They range from warm-ups, to fun games to complete ESL lesson plans. Check out these conversation activities below. Clicking on the title will take you to the article with all the information. How to set it up, resources needed, etc. The Small Talk Game Small talk is an important, but often overlooked skill. Get…

Continue Reading

How to Teach English Conversation

English-conversation

How to Teach English Conversation Many foreign ESL teachers abroad, especially in places like South Korea, teach predominantly English conversation classes. Some teachers (and students too!) have the perception that teaching English conversation involves just “talking” to the students. Free-talking does have a role in helping students learn English. However, it shouldn’t be the only thing we do in our English conversation classes. More than just Free-Talking There is far more to English conversation than just free-talking. In my first year of teaching, I was given a “free-talking” class with middle school students. My boss told me to just talk to…

Continue Reading

2 Lesson Plans for Advanced ESL Students

2 Lesson plans for advanced ESL students

Here are 2 lesson plans for advanced ESL students that are guaranteed to get your students speaking English and enjoying their conversation or discussion class. Renewable Energy The first is a renewable energy ESL lesson plan. It’s perfect for advanced ESL students anywhere in the world that are reasonably knowledgeable about technology. It also contains my PPT that I used for a 3-hour class, although I’ve adapted this lesson for classes ranging from 1.5 to 4 hours. Youth Unemployment in Korea The second is a lesson plan for advanced students about Youth Unemployment in Korea. In this case, I used…

Continue Reading

Role Plays for ESL Students

role-plays-for-ESL-students

A short video talking about role plays for ESL students-why I like them so much and how I go about using them in my own ESL speaking and conversation classes. For even more activity ideas for your speaking classes beyond role-plays, sign-up for my email list. You’ll get some goodness delivered to your inbox each week. I promise to respect your privacy!

Continue Reading

ESL Speaking Activity for Adults: Just a Minute

just a minute

Just a Minute is a fun ESL speaking activity for adults that’s perfect as a warm-up at the beginning of your classes. I heard about this one in a presentation about toastmasters and have been using it in my adult ESL classes ever since. Be sure to adapt it to your level-shorter for beginners and longer for more advanced. Like this activity? There are 38 more in 39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Speaking Activities: For Teenagers and Adults

Continue Reading

ESL Conversation Teaching Tips

role-plays-for-ESL-students

Get the book free before it’s published by signing up for my email list. Email Address Some of my favorite tips for teaching ESL conversation and speaking. It can be quite a difficult subject to teach because everything happens in real-time and you often need to react instantly to what’s happening around you. But like any skill, teaching ESL speaking can be improved through practice. ESL Conversation Teaching Tips: Provide a Demonstration of the Language or Activity Engaging Apathetic Students ESL Lesson Planning Template Teach your Students how to Ask Questions Graded Language: Use it!

Continue Reading

5 Lesson Plans for Advanced ESL Conversation Classes

conversation

Advanced conversation classes can be a bit tricky to teach because it’s sometimes hard to see any improvement in your students. But, I’ve found that it can be really useful if you use authentic material and challenge your students that way instead of just relying on ESL textbooks, which are often too easy and often quite boring. Here are five lesson plans that I’ve used in my own advanced level English conversation classes: Students in any Country Technology and Sleep Google Investing in Renewable Energy Students in Korea Cigarette Prices to Double Agricultural Subsidies Korea’s Aging Population For even more…

Continue Reading

English Conversation Teaching Tip

conversation

For those who teach English conversation classes, here is my #1 tip to do it well. Conversation is a two-way street and in order to be good at it our students need to know how to ask questions. Conversation is not simply asking and answering something like: A: “How was your weekend?” B: “It was good.” A better conversation would look like this: A: “How was your weekend?” B: “It was good, I saw a movie.” A: “Really? What movie?” B: “I saw Kung Fu Panda. Have you seen it?” Or: A: “How was your weekend?” B: “It was a…

Continue Reading